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Is according to any major Judaic sect, naming god Allah is idolatry?

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A fundamental Muslim practice is naming the god of Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Joseph and Ishmael in Arabic Allah (ٱللَّٰه) while not necessarily denying that the name of god in Hebrew is Yahwah (יהוה).

This may or might not be considered idolatry within Judaism; if Arabic has any liturgical significance in Hebrew, or if Quranic or even pre Islamic Arabic (in which the word Allah also exists) is considered a sacred language in Judaism, than there is an even smaller chance that this would be idolatry by any major Judaic sect.

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8 comments

Not sure how this is even a question - there are many names of God in Hebrew as well as in other languages (e.g., English: God, Lord, Almighty, etc.). Why should Arabic be any different? manassehkatz‭ about 2 months ago

Because Arabic might be considered an essentially sacred language within some Judaic ideologies, or have a status similar to that of any sacred language (Hebrew/Aramaic) and it might be that Judaism can recognize that the Ishmaelites had their own traditions about El/Yahwah; this question is tediously bonded with the question "are god's names in Hebrew essentialist or eternal in all reality"? JohnDoea‭ about 2 months ago

The answer is simply no. Would you upvote such an answer? All Allah means is The God... robev‭ about 2 months ago

robev, I am not sure your argument is correct because as far as I know "LA ILA ILLA ALLAH" means there is no god but the (named "Allah") god. JohnDoea‭ about 2 months ago

Just because some other religion pretends to make up a different name for a deity has no meaning for Judaism. It is just like xianity calling god jesus or greek making the chief deity zeus. sabbahillel‭ about 2 months ago

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1 answer

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No, there are no forbidden languages in Judaism. Not from any perspective. Arabic didn't even exist for centuries after Judaism was founded.

"Allah" is just a word. I'm a Persian-American Jew, and while the Farsi word for God is "khodah," a few words are rooted in Arabic and thus include the "-allah" suffix. We use them, and "khodah," without reservation in our community -- all of the most religious people in our community do in Farsi.

As a note -- none of these is the name of God from any religious perspective. These are words used that refer to the idea of God. The name of God is a separate topic.

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Hello, I understand that your answer is not compliant with the Sha-ha-da "La ila Il-la Allah" and in Hebrew --- אין אלוה אלא אללה ; but, I might understand wrong and Allah is indeed not a name, but if it's not than it should have been "La ila il-la ila" and in Hebrew --- אין אלוה אלא אלוה. JohnDoea‭ 21 days ago

I have no idea what you just said. DanHakimi‭ 15 days ago

By the way, the tetragrammaton -- the four hebrew letters you wrote above -- are the name of God. They're not a hebrew word, they're just spelled here in hebrew. They're a name. They're the name you may not take in vain. "God," "el," "allah," "deus," "dios," and "khodah" are all just words meaning referring to a god, and not to a particular god (but often implied to be the Abrahamic god in context, and sometimes capitolized or used with care out of generic respect). DanHakimi‭ 15 days ago

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