Communities

Writing
Writing
Codidact Meta
Codidact Meta
The Great Outdoors
The Great Outdoors
Photography & Video
Photography & Video
Scientific Speculation
Scientific Speculation
Cooking
Cooking
Electrical Engineering
Electrical Engineering
Judaism
Judaism
Languages & Linguistics
Languages & Linguistics
Software Development
Software Development
Mathematics
Mathematics
Christianity
Christianity
Code Golf
Code Golf
Music
Music
Physics
Physics

Dashboard
Notifications
Mark all as read
Q&A

When to say fleishik versus fleishike (in English)

+0
−0

I was recently asked what the difference was between the words fleishik and fleishike, and was unable to come up with an answer. If it were just a matter of masculine/feminine case coming over from Yiddish to English I'd expect usage to be a bit more consistent.

My mother suggested that 'fleishik' was the passive word and 'fleishike' was the active word (i.e. soup cooked in a fleishik pot vs. soup which actually contains meat), but she was not very confident and I don't trust her answer; the few usage examples I've found online don't seem to follow a pattern (i.e. a fleishike restaurant.)

Why does this post require moderator attention?
You might want to add some details to your flag.
Why should this post be closed?

2 comments

Do you mean "fleishike" as the same word with a schwa syllable appended? I never thought of that as a distinct form, just a result of accent and inflection or more "yiddish" like in pronunciation. We always used fleishik (though sometimes it was more like "fleishig"). I know in England they use "meaty" and in Hebrew I think it is b'sari. rosends‭ about 1 month ago

I’ve heard it as “fleishike” only in Yiddish conjugation as a construct (“a meaty ____”) and fleishik in Yinglish (when using the Yiddish word in English context). DonielF‭ about 1 month ago

0 answers

Sign up to answer this question »

Like any library, this site offers tons of great information, but does not offer personalized, professional advice, and does not take the place of seeking such advice from your rabbi.

This community is part of the Codidact network. We have other communities too — take a look!

You can also join us in chat!

Want to advertise this community? Use our templates!